National R.O.S.E. Month on June, 2017: Should I go into the National Guard or the U.S. Marines?

June, 2017 is National R.O.S.E. Month 2017. June is National Rose Month June is National Rose Month

Should I go into the National Guard or the U.S. Marines?

Hey man, don't listen to the others that say you are too young to be focusing on your future, or to those saying you don't know what you're talking about. I respect the fact that you are trying to research your options at a young age. When I was 13, I was doing the same thing. Educate yourself! If you do this now, you won't get screwed over in the future.

I'll do my best to answer your questions, but first I'd like to explain to you the difference between the National Guard and the Marine Corps:

The National Guard is a reserve force, meaning they train one weekend a month and two weeks during the summer. They can be called up for deployment pretty much anywhere, whether it be in the United States to help with natural disaster relief, or overseas in places such as Afghanistan to fight the War on Terror. When you are in the National Guard, you serve your state as well as your country. Both the Army and the Air Force has the National Guard. If you serve in the National Guard, you can have a job back home or continue to go to school without it interfering with your military duties.

The United States Marine Corps is also a branch of the military. I'm assuming you mean Active Duty. In this case, the Marine Corps trains for deployment anywhere in the world. They have the most challenging boot camp of any armed service. Often called "soldiers of the sea", their duties include serving on Navy ships, performing ground combat operations, and defending embassies in foreign nations. If you join the Marines on Active Duty, you would be doing this job full time.

As for respect, both services earn respect. Every single branch of the military is respected. Along with that respect comes benefits, such as free college and retirement plans.

I don't know you, so therefore I cannot determine what you would like or not like. But check it out: if you still want to stay at home, get a job outside of the military, but still want to serve your country and get benefits, join the National Guard. If you want to serve your country full time, live away from home at a military base, and ONLY have a military job, join the Marine Corps.

ROTC is a program that you can participate in in college. With ROTC, you will get 100% free college, and you will take military science classes. Once you complete the ROTC program, you will be an officer. If you go in as a "recruit" as you say, or enlisted, you will have a lower rank but less responsibility in terms of paperwork, hassle, and liability. Think of it this way: enlisted personnel manage their jobs, and officers manage other people.

I wish you the best of luck with your future. It's not right for others to be shooting your question down just because you are young and "don't know anything". That's what Yahoo Answers is for, to learn! You have a while before you can make your final decision, I recommend to keep researching as much as possible. YouTube, the library, and many military websites have great info on Basic Training, the difference between branches of the military, and the process of enlisting.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask on here. Others may shoot you down, but a lot of us here are actually here to help.

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R.O.T.C Questions? Need your help!?

R.O.T.C Questions? Need your help!?

I'll do my best to answer, but please talk to whatever ROTC unit you're thinking about joining and confirm everything before basing life decsions on them.

You can commission up until you're 32, so you're not too old.

You can join with or without a scholarship, ROTC is a class you sign up for as an elective while working on a specific major (whatever you choose). You'll attend class a few times a week and attend a weekly lab where you'll do all the fun stuff.

You CAN serve the Guard/Reserves under a program known as the Simultaneous Membership Program, where you drill with and are part of a unit and also an ROTC cadet (which takes priority if there are overlapping events). You're non-deployable while attending school as a contracted cadet. They SHOULD put you in a position where you can shadow the officers and see how things work, give you some officer-like responsibility. Or they'll just make you another Joe. Whichever.

I would strongly encourage that you do the full 4 years in the program if you don't have prior military experience. If you don't you'll be playing catch-up your last 2 years (also known as the Advanced course). You'll have to coordinate with your prospective ROTC unit about getting sent to LTC (Leadership Training Course) for 4 weeks at Ft. Knox, KY where you'll basically receive a 'crash-course' to try to get you up to speed on everything you missed out on during your first two years in the program.

If money is the primary concern for attending, the unit may be able to work with you to solve the problem. Once you contract with the program, ROTC will pay your tuition and mandatory fees. Most units also have various locally based scholarships you may be eligible for, rather than just the National scholarship. You'll also recieve a monthly stipend that increases as you move through the program ($350/freshmen, $500/seniors).

If you're seriously considering it, I'd highly recommend giving them a call. Most units have an officer or NCO who's primary job is to deal with prospective cadets and answer their questions, help them work out answers. During the summer months there's not a whole lot going on so they'll have all the time in the world to help you right now. Best of luck to you.

why is black history month the shortest month of the year?

why is black history month the shortest month of the year?

Kush is on the right track but did not give the full story. The reason February is Black History Month is because Dr. Carter G. Woodson selected the week of February 12-18, 1926 to celebrate what was then known as N-e-g-r-o history. He selected those dates because wanted to include the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (February 12) and Frederick Douglass (February 17) in the celebration week. Over time the week long celebration evolved into what we know today as Black History Month.

We can (and do) celebrate our history all year long, but in February the celebration is on a national scale. For instance here in Texas we celebrate June 19th as Juneteenth. This is the anniversary of the day in 1863 when the news of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation reached slaves here. This day is also celebrated in several other places. Nationally, December 1 is remembered as the Day a Small Woman Made a Big Stand. This is the anniversary of the day in 1955 when Montgomery, Alabama seamstress Rosa Parks (R.I.P.) refused to give up her seat on a city bus to white man. Mrs. Parks was arrested and charged with civil disobedience. This led to a citywide bus boycott (led by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) by African Americans that lasted just over a year and was the spark that ignited the Civil Rights Movement. Because of Mrs. Parks brave stand, the first forward facing seat immediately behind the driver (this is where Mrs. Parks was sitting on December 1, 1955) on every city bus in the U.S. is designated with a special color (here in San Antonio that color is gold) and/or a special in inscription (here in San Antonio that inscription reads "This seat is dedicated to the memory of Rosa Parks 1913-2005) in her honor. There are also other dates (too many to mention here) that are important in African American history, one of them being April 15, 1947 (if you're a sports fan you know what happened that day).

There is no month specifically designated as White History Month. African Americans today are no longer being overtly oppressed, but there are covert ways that could be construed by some as such.

Agoda
Holidays also on this date Thursday, June 1, 2017...