Nelson Mandela International Day 2018 is on Wednesday, July 18, 2018: nelson mandela question?

Wednesday, July 18, 2018 is Nelson Mandela International Day 2018. Nelson Mandela International Day (or Mandela Day) is an annual international day in honour of Nelson Mandela, celebrated each 18 July (on Mandela's birthday).

Nelson Mandela International

Nelson Mandela International Day (or Mandela Day) is an annual international day in honour of Nelson Mandela, celebrated each 18 July (on Mandela's birthday).

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nelson mandela question?

--Nelson Mandela is the greatest African of all time. No one can top that. Even Kwame Nkrumah will have a hard time filling his shoes. Mandela is an angel and on the day he’s called to the yonder, the heavens will stand still to welcome him back home.

No human being spends 27 unjust years in jail and comes out oozing with forgiveness. “For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others,” he said. “If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.”

Of all the African freedom fighters, he suffered the most. Yet he’s the only one amongst the lot who led his nation to independence but refused to clinch to power as if he owned the country.

“It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur,” he said. “You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.”

He used his short stay in power to promote peace and reconciliation among his citizens – not to hound his opponents, saying, “If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.”

It is in recognition of his rare humane character that United Nations General Assembly decided to pass a resolution that July 18 every year should be observed around the world as ‘Nelson Mandela International Day’. In passing the resolution, the assembly hailed Mandela’s “promotion of a culture of peace.”

Nelson Mandela, a Nobel Peace Laureate, deserves every recognition he gets. Hundreds years from now, he’d be remembered as a true African legend – an angel amongst men and mankind would forever thank the heavens for sparing him for almost a century.

The world would never have another Mandela. But, hopefully, the UN General Assembly’s decision to set aside a day to celebrate his life will help breed more sensible, peace-loving leaders – especially in Africa – who will not seek strength in dividing their people along political or ethnic lines; leaders who will not stop thinking about how the world will remember them after they are long gone. “We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right,” the great man says.More............ ----------- Mandela Day

The United Nations has declared July 18 "Nelson Mandela International Day" to mark the South African anti-apartheid leader's contribution to peace. A resolution adopted by consensus by the 192-member world body calls for commemorations every year starting in 2010 on July 18 - Mandela's birthday - to recognise the Nobel Peace Prize laureate's contribution to resolving conflicts and promoting race relations, human rights and reconciliation.

By adopting the resolution, General Assembly President Ali Treki said the international community was expressing its appreciation for "a great man" who suffered for the sake of people everywhere.

The spirit of Mandela on Robben Island Mandela, 91, led the fight against apartheid in South Africa as head of the African National Congress' armed wing. He was convicted of sabotage and other crimes and served 27 years in prison. When he was freed in 1990, he supported reconciliation and helped lead South Africa's transition toward multi-racial democracy.

Mandela became the country's first president to win in a fully democratic election and led South Africa from 1994-99. He is celebrated today as an international statesman and continues to speak out on human rights and other global issues.

------------------------------ Following his release from prison on 11 February 1990, Mandela supported reconciliation and negotiation, and helped lead the transition towards multi-racial democracy in South Africa.

Since the end of apartheid, many have frequently praised Mandela, including former opponents. In South Africa he is often known as Madiba, an honorary title adopted by elders of Mandela's clan. The title has come to be synonymous with Nelson Mandela.

Mandela is currently a celebrated elder statesman who continues to voice his opinion on topical issues. He has received more than 250 awards over four decades, most notably the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize. In November 2009, the United Nations General Assembly announced that Mandela's birthday, 18 July, is to be known as 'Mandela Day' marking his contribution to world freedom

Is Nelson mandela a global citizen?

Is Nelson mandela a global citizen?

Nelson Mandela is nothing more than a sweet-talking revolutionary Communist who gave passing support to Stalin in his book "How to be a Good Communist".

He was a member of Umkhonto We Sizwe ("Spear of the Nation"), the military wing of the ANC, and was convicted of conspiracy to commit sabotage and terrorism. At the Rivonia trial, the evidence for the planned wave of attacks from the list of planned orders for thousands of hand grenades and other explosive devices was very telling. It was enough that even Amnesty International, by far not a "right-wing" organization, refused to classify Mandela as a political prisoner during his entire 27 years in prison.

Mandela is an ardent admirer of Fidel Castro and was a tremendous supporter of the Soviet Union, being trained by their cadres in guerrilla warfare.

Upon his release from prison, he openly saluted the South African Communist Party in a statement that was condemned by the former ANC supporter turned critic Rev. Sipo Mzimela. Mzimela had hoped that 27 years in prison had moderated Mandela, but such hopes were quickly shattered.

Mandela's ANC was known to be far more brutal towards blacks who opposed its rise to power than whites. Any black moderate who opposed the Soviet-sponsored revolution was deemed an "enemy of the people" and was summarily targeted for execution. Over 600 South African blacks met death by this means, mostly by the infamous "necklace", where a gasoline-filled tire was placed around the neck of the victim and set on fire. Others met death by violent explosives, as in one picture I saw years ago of a bombed restaurant with the body of a headless black man lying on the ground. Additionally, conditions at the infamous ANC Quatro prison camp in Angola, reserved for former ANC guerrillas who somehow ran afoul of the leadership, were nothing short of a concentration camp.

In a slightly personal case, my father was a ham radio operator who daily communicated with a white friend in South Africa. This man, who was apolitical, employed a black woman as a maid. One day when she was with her family at her home the ANC "comrades" pulled up, dragged her out of the house and, condemning her as an "enemy of the people", stabbed her to death in front of her own family. Her crime? Simply working for a white man. THIS WOMAN DIED SO NELSON MANDELA COULD HAVE POWER.

Another courageous black South African, Tamsanqua Linda, former mayor of a township and a member of Mandela's own Xhosa tribe, was put on the ANC's death list. A supermarket he owned was firebombed and his family was shot at in their home. Despite threats, Linda visited the United States ahead of Mandela's first trip here, visiting every city that Mandela visited to expose him as a Communist terrorist. I had the privilege of meeting Mr. Linda on two of his visits to the U.S. Since the ANC takeover in 1994, he has not been heard from in the Western press.

South Africa, once a jewel of relative prosperity on an otherise bleak and poor continent, with over 500,000 blacks illegally crossing into it every year, suffered an unemployment increase of 1 million after the ANC came to power in 1994. It has since suffered from one of the highest crime rates in the world, with murder 10 times more common than in the U.S. It has been run for several years by the infamous Thabo Mbeki, the terrorist leader of Umkhonto, and now is poised to be led by the even more dictatorial Zuma, who appears to be a Mugabe-like character who will slide South Africa into ever increasing socialist tyranny.

This is the legacy of Nelson Mandela, the clever, smooth talking speaker whose real face has been hidden by a Marxist-sympathizing Western press for decades.

Of course, any such talk as this is merely dismissed as "racist" and apartheid promoting. But South Africa, as well as much of black Africa, has been beset for many generations by tribal warfare (think the Rwandan genocide). Apartheid, meaning "separate development", was a program of gradual independence for the tribal homelands in an effort to forcibly end this violence. Unfortunately, racist sentiments were also present from the beginning, and this led to the development of racial segregation. The Soviet Union, eyeing South Africa's share of southern Africa's vast mineral wealth, and knowing how important the tip of Africa was to oil shipping routes to the West, exploited this issue as a smoke screen for these strategic interests and employed agents such as the KGB's white Joe Slovo to guide the ANC. Thus the ANC, having started as a moderate organization working for the rights of black South Africans in 1911, was coopted and became a vehicle for Soviet subversion and conquest. And even though the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991 (yet remained with all the KGB agents and former Communist Party officials in power), the drive to betray and enslave South Africa was by then so far on its way it could not be stopped.

If you don't know what's wrong with that, consider that the Communists murdered over 100 million human beings in the 20th Century, with the Soviet Union at the head of this human tragedy. And in places like China they are still doing it.

That's the real Mandela for you. That's his "global citizenry". If you consider the fact that the world seems to support all this, I guess you can call him a "global citizen". I sure wouldn't want to be called one.

Nelson Mandela and Amnesty International?

Nelson Mandela and Amnesty International?

Ask them. You've posted this nonsense several times a day, for several days. Your post is an obvious hoax, and it has been reported.

Agoda
Holidays also on this date Wednesday, July 18, 2018...