Social Security Education Awareness Month on May, 2020: Why doesn't Social Security consider Epilepsy a diddability?

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Why doesn’t Social Security consider Epilepsy a diddability?

Social Security defines disability (Epilepsy) as an inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity because of a medically determinable physical or mental impairment, or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.

STEP THREE states that In epilepsy, regardless of etiology, degree of impairment will be determined according to type, frequency, duration, and sequelae of seizures. At least one detailed description of a typical seizure is required. Testimony of persons other than the claimant is essential for description of type and frequency of seizures if professional observation is not available. Epilepsy is evaluated under the neurological body system – medical listing 11.02 and 11.03.

11.02 Epilepsy – convulsive epilepsy (grand mal or psychomotor) documented by detailed description of a typical seizure pattern, including all associated phenomena; occurring more frequently than once a month, in spite of at least 3 months of prescribed treatment. With:

Daytime episodes (loss of consciousness and convulsive seizures) or

Nocturnal episodes manifesting residuals which interfere significantly with activity during the day.

11.03 Epilepsy – nonconvulsive epilepsy (petit mal, psychomotor, or focal) documented by detailed description of a typical seizure pattern, including all associated phenomena, occurring more frequently than once weekly, in spite of at least 3 months of prescribed treatment. With alteration of awareness or loss of consciousness and transient postictal manifestations of unconventional behavior or significant interference with activity during the day.

STEP FOUR explores the ability of an individual to perform work he has done in the past despite his epilepsy disability. If SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step.

STEP FIVE looks at age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other work, if any, the person can perform. To determine disability, SSA enlists vocational rules, which vary according to age.

For example, if a person is:

Under age 50 and, as a result of the symptoms of epilepsy, unable to perform what SSA calls sedentary work, then SSA will reach a determination of disabled. Sedentary work requires the ability to lift a maximum of 10 pounds at a time, sit six hours and occasionally walk and stand two hours per eight-hour day.

Age 50 or older and, due to his epilepsy disability, limited to performing sedentary work but has no work-related skills that allow him to do so, SSA will reach a determination of disabled.

Over age 60 and, due to his epilepsy disability unable to perform any of the jobs he performed in the last 15 years, SSA will likely reach a determination of disabled.

Any age and, because of epilepsy, has a psychological impairment that prevents even simple, unskilled work, SSA will reach a determination of disabled.

Problems To Overcome In Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

More than one million people will file for benefits from the Social Security Administration this year. The bad news is, 60% who apply for benefits will be denied. The good news is, help is available to improve your odds of getting benefits, should you or a loved one become disabled.

All working Americans contribute 7.65 percent from every paycheck to FICA tax. Some of that payment goes toward disability insurance coverage by the Social Security Administration. However, bureaucratic problems plaguing SSA’s Disability Insurance program prevent fair and speedy distribution of benefits to people who are eligible.

These are some of the problems you’ll face if you choose to apply by yourself:

A backlog of more than a million unprocessed disability claims;

An average five-month wait after filing a claim before receiving an answer on the initial claim, and almost a year of additional delays if the claim is appealed;

A backlog of 1.5 million disability cases now awaiting review, with another half million cases coming up for review each year.

social security does consider epilepsy a disability...you can file go to your local social security office.....

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What are President Obama’s views on special education?

What are President Obama's views on special education?

* Fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act so that students

with disabilities will get the public education they have a right to;

* Ensure that all states have the support to adopt comprehensive newborn

screening programs and set a national goal to provide voluntary

re-screening for all two-year-olds – the age at which some conditions,

including autism spectrum disorders, begin to appear;

* Expand Early Head Start to serve more children with disabilities and

spur states, through Obama's Early Learning Challenge Grants, to expand

programs for children with disabilities, such as IDEA Part C, and

integrate these programs with other early childhood programs; and

* Help more students with disabilities attend college by funding

Vocational Rehabilitation programs to provide better counseling and

offering a new, fully refundable $4,000 American Opportunity Tax Credit

to make college more affordable.

Support Students with Disabilities: Obama and Biden will work to ensure the academic success of students with disabilities by increasing funding and effectively enforcing the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and by holding schools accountable for providing students with disabilities the services and supports they need to reach their potential. Obama and Biden will also support Early Intervention services for infants and toddlers, and will work to improve college opportunities for high school graduates with disabilities.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today issued the following statement in support of President Obama's proclamation of October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month:

"President Obama and I recognize the critical role that education plays in empowering the next generation of Americans with disabilities. Through education, we can help people with disabilities build a strong foundation of knowledge and marketable skills with expectations for employment and the ability to give back to others in their communities. Stimulus funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act represents an unprecedented investment in students with disabilities and demonstrates the administration’s commitment to helping all Americans achieve success in school and work. We are proud of the many projects underway at the Department of Education to assist children and adults with disabilities in acquiring the tools they need to achieve their dreams," Secretary Duncan said.

To celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) will feature innovative, employment-based projects and individual success stories on .

In addition, the office will join the Department of Labor, Social Security Administration and other federal agencies for a celebration sponsored by the American Association of People with Disabilities Oct. 12-13 in Duluth, Minn., highlighting the importance of exposing youth with disabilities to work-based learning and job shadowing opportunities. OSERS staff will be gathering input in coming weeks from parents, educators, students with disabilities and others to inform work on upcoming legislative reauthorizations and issues of importance to students with disabilities.

(October 6, 2009, 2009)

Can I get my learner’s permit without taking Driver’s Ed?

Can I get my learner's permit without taking Driver's Ed?

At age 15:

Provide your state or county certified birth certificate or other acceptable form of identification

Provide your social security number

Pass both written and vision screening tests

Complete an Affidavit of Liability Guardianship (DR2460) form

Provide an Affidavit of Completion of a Driver Education Classroom Course form indicating that you have completed and passed the classroom portion of a state-approved driver education course within 6 months prior to applying for your instruction permit.

The 30 hour classroom study course can be either in a classroom or taken on the internet. Click here for a list of approved instructors

At 15 and a half:

Provide your state or county certified birth certificate or another acceptable form of identification

Provide your social security number

Pass both written and vision screening tests

Complete an Affidavit of Liability and Guardianship: form DR2460

Provide proof that you have completed the 4-hour Driver Awareness Program or completed a 30 hour classroom study course.

The 30 hour classroom course can be in a classroom or on the internet. This requires completion 6 months prior to applying for your Driver's Instruction Permit. The Statement of Completion form is located on the reverse side of the DR2460. Click here for a list of approved instructors.

At 16:

•Provide your state or county certified birth certificate or another acceptable form of identification

•Provide your social security number

•Pass both written and vision screen tests

•Complete an Affidavit of Liability and Gaurdianship: form DR2460

But keep in mind, without drivers ed your risk is higher, and so is your insurance.

Agoda
Holidays also on this date Friday, May 1, 2020...