Use Less Stuff Day 2020 is on Friday, November 20, 2020: COPS ONLY what is a regular day as a cop?

Agoda

Friday, November 20, 2020 is Use Less Stuff Day 2020. Dietitians Online Blog: November 15, America Recycles Day and Use ... is "Use Less Stuff Day.

Use Less Stuff Day

Inside a world with quickly diminishing natural assets, conservation can be quite important. Use Less Stuff Day is about re-using, patching up, recycling and handing things lower instead of tossing them and purchasing something totally new.

COPS ONLY what is a regular day as a cop?

My typical day as a town cop works like this: I arrive at the station about forty-five minutes prior to my shift starting so I can get changed out, check my messages and email, fix any reports that are about to get shipped out to the DA's Office, etc. Just like house keeping stuff.

When my shift starts we have roll call, where myself and the other officers I work with on my shift sit down with our patrol sergeant and we discuss what's going on in the town for that day. We learn about what happened during the last shift and what to expect for the upcoming shift and if there's anything out of the ordinary going on later in the day. For instance, on the 4th of July we had a parade detail, that sort of stuff.

Roll call lasts for about half an hour to an hour, depending on how much BSing we do around the table. We then head out to parking lot and do our cruiser checks, making sure all of our equipment is there and ready, the lights on the car work, etc. Then we do a quick radio check, turn the laptop on, and head out of the gate.

The rest of the shift is just patrol. I'll pull over a few cars here and there for moving violations and respond to calls as they come in. If it's an exceptionally slow day, we have a clipboard with service paperwork on it, like non-criminal summons, protection orders, etc. We drive to the addresses on the paperwork and try to service the people listed.

We get an hour for lunch and we each take lunch at different times, because with so few people on our shift, we can't all take lunch together. I typically will just go back to the station and eat lunch in the squad room, watch a little tv, check my email again, messages etc.

When I have about two hours left in my shift, I'll head back to the station and do reports. I can do the reports on my in car laptop and save them to a zip drive, but I don't find this comfortable. I might spend an hour total doing paper work, but I drag it out so I don't have to be on the road until the end of my shift. If there's a call, I'll obviously respond.

At the end of my shift, I spray the cruiser down with a hose and clean it out of any trash or dirt I got inside of it. I do a quick inspection on the equipment and hand the keys over to the next shift.

To answer your questions: Paper work depends on the day, I could have as little as a few speeding tickets to fill out, or I could have a phone book thick case report that has to go out within 24 hours of the arrest. It could take as long as four or five hours. This is where overtime comes in.

I see all sorts of people during my day, from tourists to locals, business owners, school kids, ... I occassionally see my friends who come through town on their days off, or after work.

The most common law I see broken is usually something involving traffic. People speed and roll through stop signs all the time. It all depends though. In one night you could respond to three bar fights down town and two domestics the other way.

I try to give out as few tickets as possible, no lie. Manly because I hate writing them out while I'm sitting at a traffic stop. I try to give people as many chances as possible, but you'd be surprised how many motorists talk themselves into getting a citation when all I was going to do was tell them to use their blinker next time.

The town I work in has a force of about forty officers to work across three shifts, so more often than not, I'm alone in my car, but I'm never partner-less. It's a quick radio call for any back up I need, whether it's my own guys or the guys in the next town over.

And working days or nights, it depends on the roation at the station. Most rookies start working nights and eventually lateral over into day work. I worked nights for three years, started off working the 0200-1000 shift, then the 1800-0200, and now I'm 1000-1800, which is probably the best shift to work, sleep in, and when you get off shift, it's still early enough to go out and have a life.

I hope my exhaustive reply gives you some insight.

How do YOU do Valentines day?

How do YOU do Valentines day?

Well my husband and I have been married for almost 7 years and my husband hates valentines day. He says that its just a Hallmark holiday. Before we got engaged we use to get stuff for each other. He use to get me balloons and have them sent to school. And every year in high school we got each other a bear with the year on it.

D day invasion on normady?

D day invasion on normady?

D-Day Airborne and Beach Assault

Detailed map of Normandy

The Normandy beaches were chosen by planners because they lay within range of air cover, and were less heavily defended than the obvious objective of the Pas de Calais, the shortest distance between Great Britain and the Continent. Airborne drops at both ends of the beachheads were to protect the flanks, as well as open up roadways to the interior. Six divisions were to land on the first day; three U.S., two British and one Canadian. Two more British and one U.S. division were to follow up after the assault division had cleared the way through the beach defenses.

Disorganization, confusion, incomplete or faulty implementation of plans characterized the initial phases of the landings. This was especially true of the airborne landings which were badly scattered, as well as the first wave units landing on the assault beaches. To their great credit, most of the troops were able to adapt to the disorganization. In the end, the Allies achieved their objective.

Airborne Assault

Airborne assault map with detailed information

The AIRBORNE ASSAULT into Normandy as part of the D-Day Allied invasion of Europe was the largest use of airborne troops up to that time. Paratroopers of the U.S. 82d and 101st Airborne divisions, the British 6th Airborne Division, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, and other attached Allied units took part in the assault. Numbering more than 13,000 men, the paratroopers were flown from bases in southern England to the Cotentin Peninsula in approximately 925 C-47 airplanes. An additional 4,000 men, consisting of glider infantry with supporting weapons and medical and signal units, were to arrive in 500 gliders later on D-Day to reinforce the paratroopers. The parachute troops were assigned what was probably the most difficult task of the initial operation -- a night jump behind enemy lines five hours before the coastal landings.

To protect the invasion zone's western extremity and to facilitate the "Utah" landing force's movement into the Cotentin Peninsula, the U.S. 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions descended on the peninsula by parachute and glider in the early hours of D-Day. The paratroopers were badly scattered. Many were injured and killed during the attack, and much of their equipment was lost. But the brave paratroopers fought fiercely, causing confusion among the German commanders and keeping the Germans troops occupied. Their efforts, hampered by harsh weather, darkness and disorganization, and initiative of resourceful soldiers and leaders, ensured that the UTAH BEACH assault objectives were eventually accomplished. The British and Canadian attacks also accomplished their primary goal of securing the left flank of the invasion force.

Utah Beach

UTAH BEACH was added to the initial invasion plan almost as an afterthought. The allies needed a major port as soon as possible, and UTAH BEACH would put VII (U.S.) Corps within 60 kilometers of Cherbourg at the outset. The major obstacles in this sector were not so much the beach defenses, but the flooded and rough terrain that blocked the way north.

Omaha Beach

OMAHA BEACH linked the U.S. and British beaches. It was a critical link between the Contentin peninsula and the flat plain in front of Caen. Omaha was also the most restricted and heavily defended beach, and for this reason at least one veteran U.S. Division (lst) was tasked to land there. The terrain was difficult. Omaha beach was unlike any of the other assault beaches in Normandy. Its crescent curve and unusual assortment of bluffs, cliffs and draws were immediately recognizable from the sea. It was the most defensible beach chosen for D-Day; in fact, many planners did not believe it a likely place for a major landing. The high ground commanded all approaches to the beach from the sea and tidal flats. Moreover, any advance made by U.S. troops from the beach would be limited to narrow passages between the bluffs. Advances directly up the steep bluffs were difficult in the extreme. German strong points were arranged to command all the approaches and pillboxes were sited in the draws to fire east and west, thereby enfilading troops while remaining concealed from bombarding warships. These pillboxes had to be taken out by direct assault. Compounding this problem was the allied intelligence failure to identify a nearly full-strength infantry division, the 352nd, directly behind the beach. It was believed to be no further forward than St. Lo and Caumont, 20 miles inland.

V (U.S.) Corps was assigned to this sector. The objective was to obtain a lodgment area between Port-en-Bessin and the Vire River and ultimately push forward to St. Lo and Caumont in order to cut German communications (St. Lo was a major road junction). Allocated to the task were 1st and 29th (U.S.) Divisions, supported by the 5th Ranger Battalion and 5th Engineer Special Brigade.

Agoda
Holidays also on this date November 20, 2020...