National Youth Traffic Safety Month on May, 2017: What is the BestEasietCheapest way to travel throughout England, Scotland and Wales?

May, 2017 is National Youth Traffic Safety Month 2017. Philanthropy in Motion: Day 142: National Youth Traffic Safety Month National Youth Traffic Safety

What is the Best/Easiet/Cheapest way to travel throughout England, Scotland and Wales?

If you are not from the UK, you can buy unlimited train travel in advance before you come here (see for example) but if you are British this isn't possible, so you will have to explore more creatively. A young person's railcard can help, as can avoiding peak times and booking tickets in advance. You can also get "fab four" tickets if there is a group of people travelling together.

Apart from the train, you might find www.megabus.com do cheap tickets (£1-5) to some locations, and many towns and counties have cheap local bus travel, often with the option of daily, weekly or monthly travel passes. National Express go to more places, but are a bit more expensive.

You could also consider lift-share schemes or finding travelling companions (eg check out ). Hitch-hiking has some safety concerns, but is completely free of charge. You could also hire a car, with longer rentals having lower daily costs (eg ).

Finally, consider purchasing a vehicle at the start of your stay, and re-selling it before you leave. A bicycle would be cheapest and require no running costs, but leaves you exposed to weather, limited in speed and requires physical fitness. A motorbike or car will need road tax, insurance and an international drivers license. Be aware that our fuel is very expensive, and in cities there can be heavy traffic and expensive parking.

In terms of acommodation, there are several cheap options including camping ( or might be good places to start), youth hostels ( ) or bed and breakfast ( )

I hope that gives you a start, but feel free to ask more specific questions for more info.

Amazon Gold Box

I need help with persuasive speech?

I need help with persuasive speech?

This article is designed to raise the concern about teen driving fatalities and what can be done to drastically reduce this alarming statistic. While this article may be sensitive to some readers in certain industries, we would like to raise the question as to what can be done to make our teens better drivers and how to alert others on the road that a new driver is behind the wheel.

Our previous article raised the question of whether the driving age in the country needs to be raised to age 18. With more teen fatalities on the road each year than the amount of deaths reported from 9/11, we must consider changes to our laws governing teen driving. From another perspective one could say that the number of teen deaths on the roads in the U.S. are greater than the number of deaths reported of U.S. soldiers before and after the war in Iraq! Are our roads a war zone?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported 3,657 drivers aged 15 to 20 years killed in 2003. In 2002, the number killed in the same age range was 3,827. While one would never make light of 9/11, let us consider the amount of energy, government changes, money, war - to name just a few - put forth after 9/11. If only a fraction of this energy had been given to the teen driving problem, perhaps we could have reduced teen driving related deaths in 2002 and 2003 - a staggering total of 7,484.

Following is a combined statement from

Article Source: - Gordon Booth, Chief Instructor of Drivetrain, Inc. in California, , and

- Eddie Wren of Drive and Stay Alive in New York, , regarding our teen driving problem:

"Research in several countries has shown not only that the younger people are when they start to drive the higher the chances of having a serious or fatal crash within the first year of driving, but also that a young person's brain is not fully developed until after the teenage years have passed, and that this, in turn, also reduces a young person's abilities as a safe driver.

Wisdom and any genuine desire to protect young people both undeniably dictate that it is better if teenagers do not start to drive until they are at least 17 or preferably 18 years old.

It is noticeable that if parents can hold back a female for 6 months, so they do not start driving until 17 or 18, then one sees them mature at least 12 months. With males a hold back of about a year equals a maturity increase of about 6 months."

Inexperience, risk taking behavior, and immaturity are cited as primary reasons for these accidents. Increasing the driving age to 18 would not necessarily change all three primary reasons. Therefore, we must consider other possible solutions as well, such as the driving education process itself.

We hope the above information was helpful to address the problems, the need, and identify options if the driving age remained status quo or if it were raised. We hope the information was comprehensive to show the economic implications and the hindrances to raising the driving age. With these alarming statistics why have state and federal governments, as well as, the automotive industry jumped to the rescue? Have financial issues during hard economic times been put ahead of our youth? We have to "cowboy-up" to a resolution about this national problem.

Resource of information on driving safety for parents of teen drivers. Our content relates to student drivers with permit learners driver license or teen drivers that have their operator drivers license. Learning to drive and undergoing drivers ed, driving school or traffic school for driving lessons for drivers in training.

Article Source:

Article Source:

Agoda
Holidays also on this date Monday, May 1, 2017...